COUNTY LOCATION
OF
NEW ENGLAND PLACE NAMES


Ray Angelo1

and

David E. Boufford1

1Harvard University Herbaria, 22 Divinity Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138-2094



CT    ME    MA     NH    RI    VT        Key Map



INTRODUCTION

This is the web version of this reference, of which there were two earlier printed versions (early 1980's and 1995).

This work intends to provide the county location for all cities, towns, villages, islands and for a select few major geographic features in New England. Most counties have been given a readily interpretable four letter abbreviation. See the key map for the locations of the New England counties and for the abbreviations used here. See also the listing farther below. Four of the largest counties in Maine (Penobscot, Piscataquis, Somerset, and Oxford) and Coös County in New Hampshire have been divided into northern and southern sections (see map on p.v). These counties have a three letter abbreviation with an appended -N or -S that corresponds to the northern or southern section. Aroostook County in Maine is so large that it has been divided into three sectors (see map on p. v). The abbreviation for this county has been given suffixes -NE, -NW, and -S corresponding to these sectors. The divisions for these counties conform to the geographical units being used to inventory collections in the vascular herbarium of the New England Botanical Club. Two islands of special interest, Mount Desert Island (MT.DE), Maine and Block Isl. (BLOCK ISL.), Rhode Island and the few locales on them have been given their own abbreviations. Mount Desert Island is part of Hancock County. Block Island is part of Washington County.

Where a given place name is represented in three or more counties within a state, the word "several" is given for the name rather than listing all the counties where the name occurs. Some places do not currently exist. The most notable example is the group of townships (Dana, Prescott, Greenwich, and Enfield) flooded by the Quabbin Reservoir in Massachusetts. As indicated above townships are indicated by capitalization of the name. The names of cities that are not associated with townships are also capitalized. Bold face is used to indicate those township-range units in Maine that are municipal civil divisions that are equivalent to townships.

The 67 New England counties and their abbreviations are:

       Maine
  1. Androscoggin (ANDR)
  2. Aroostook (ARO)
  3. Cumberland (CUMB)
  4. Franklin (FRAN)
  5. Hancock (HANC)
  6. Kennebec (KENN)
  7. Knox (KNOX)
  8. Lincoln (LINC)
  9. Oxford (OXF)
10. Penobscot (PEN)
11. Piscataquis (PIS)
12. Sagadahoc (SAGA)
13. Somerset (SOM)
14. Waldo (WALD)
15. Washington (WASH)
16. York (YORK)
      New Hampshire

  1. Belknap (BELK)
  2. Carroll (CARR)
  3. Cheshire (CHES)
  4. Cos (COO)
  5. Grafton (GRAF)
  6. Hillsboro (HILL)
  7. Merrimack (MERR)
  8. Rockingham (ROCK)
  9. Strafford (STRA)
10. Sullivan (SULL)
        Vermont

  1. Addison ADDI)
  2. Bennington (BENN)
  3. Caledonia (CALE)
  4. Chittenden (CHIT)
  5. Essex (ESSE)
  6. Franklin (FRAN)
  7. Grand Isle (GrIS)
  8. Lamoille (LAMO)
  9. Orange (ORAN)
10. Orleans (ORLE)
11. Rutland (RUTL)
12. Washington (WASH)
13. Windham (WINH)
14. Windsor (WINS)
 
        Massachusetts

  1. Barnstable (BARN)
  2. Berkshire (BERK)
  3. Bristol (BRIS)
  4. Dukes (DUKE)
  5. Essex (ESSE)
  6. Franklin (FRAN)
  7. Hampden (HAMD)
  8. Hampshire (HAMS)
  9. Middlesex (MIDD)
10. Nantucket (NANT)
11. Norfolk (NORF)
12. Plymouth (PLYM)
13. Suffolk (SUFF)
14. Worcester (WORC)
     Rhode Island

1. Bristol (BRIS)
2. Kent (KENT)
3. Newport (NEWP)
4. Providence (PROV)
5. Washington (WASH)
     Connecticut

1. Fairfield (FAIR)
2. Hartford (HART)
3. Litchfield (LITC)
4. Middlesex (MIDD)
5. New Haven (NHAV)
6. New London (NLON)
7. Tolland (TOLL)
8. Windham (WIND)

   The following abbreviations are used:


   The following sources were used:




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-- Revised: Oct. 3, 2011

Created by: Ray Angelo
rangelo@oeb.harvard.edu